The slave trade and its economic and social influence on the african continent

The Colonization of Africa Ehiedu E.

The slave trade and its economic and social influence on the african continent

The slave trade and its economic and social influence on the african continent

This exploitative commerce influenced major segments of the African political and religious aristocracies, the warrior classes, and the biracial elite, who were making small gains from the slave trade, to participate in the oppression of their own people.

Yet Europeans benefited from the Atlantic trade the most, since the commerce allowed them to amass the raw materials that fed their Industrial Revolution at the detriment of African societies whose peace and capacity to transform their modes of production into a viable entrepreneurial economy was severely halted.

While the effects of the Atlantic trade on the enslaved Africans have been partly documented, those on the non-enslaved Africans remain largely unknown. It arrested its development by exploiting its technological, agricultural, and cultural skills for the development of the West only.

Moreover, it started the systemic and continuous process of economic exploitation and social and political fragmentation that Europeans later institutionalized through colonization and neocolonization.

Furthermore, the Atlantic trade led to the formation of semi-feudal classes in Africa that collaborated with Europeans to sanction the oppression of their own people. These classes came from the African aristocracy and middlemen who facilitated the capture and sale of Africans and made substantial gains from the trade.

Yet, despite these gains, Europeans, not Africans, benefited from the trade the most. Europeans received from the trade unprecedented human labor 2 and economic capital that allowed them to develop their societies at the expense of Africa.

Historical Background The Atlantic slave trade was initially a small commercial system based on the exchange of African material or human capital, such as gold or slaves, with few European material goods, such as guns and silk.

By the end of the sixteenth century, this trade became a large market that promoted the barbaric capture and transportation of millions of Africans to the Americas. The commerce started in when ten Africans were taken from the Mauritanian coast and shipped to Lisbon.

Three years later, Africans from the same coast were brought to Lisbon. While domestic forms of slavery and the trans- Saharan slave trade existed in Africa prior to the arrival of Europeans in the s, these had a lesser impact on the continent than did the Atlantic trade. The latter surpassed the earlier trade in terms of the immeasurable loss of lives and resources it brought about in Africa and the Black Diaspora.

They legitimized the removal of Africans from their homeland and their relocation in foreign territories. Yet, the Atlantic trade differed from African slavery and Arab slavery because it was founded on a unique and rigid concept of bondage. The Portuguese, whose navigation system was better than those of any European empire of the s, traded in African gold, ivory, gum, hide, wax, and slaves, which the Arabs had dominated for centuries.

By the end of the fifteenth century, the Portuguese had total control over this commerce. As Basil Davidson documents: Therefore, in Julythe British Order in Council decreed a Treaty with the colonies that allowed England to import slaves from its former U.

With free trade and the increasing demands of the sugar plantations, the volume of the British slave trade rose enormously. The Royal African Company, between andtransported an annual average of 5, slaves. In the first nine years of free trade Bristol alone shippedNegroes to the sugar plantations.

Inships sailed from British ports for Africa, with a capacity for 36, slaves; inthe number of ships had increased to and the number of slaves to 47, The importation into Jamaica from to was , 5 and it has been estimated that the total import of slaves into all the British colonies between and was over two million.

The disparity between the number of slaves who embarked from Africa and of those who disembarked in the Caribbean, the United States, and Brazil between and is shown in the following: Caribbean Slaves embarked from Africa: She rejects the theory that disease and famine took the lives of more Africans than the slave trade did.However the social, economic, "The African continent was bled of its human resources via all possible routes.

Across the However, as the Atlantic slave trade increased its demand, local systems which primarily serviced indentured servitude expanded. European slave trading as a result was the most pivotal change in the social. The Impact of the Slave Trade on African Economies Warren Whatley and Rob Gillezeau May 23, Contact Information Warren Whatley, Department of Economics, University of Michigan, Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, MI, The impact of the slave trade on Africa The African continent was bled of its human resources via all possible routes.

Across the Sahara, through the Red Sea, from the Indian Ocean ports and across the Atlantic. Worse still, in order to drive the economic machine, they created a new type of slavery in the form of forced labour. The European Legacy, Vol. 11, No. 6, pp. –, The Economic, Political, and Social Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade on Africa BABACAR M’BAYE ABSTRACT The Transatlantic slave trade radically impaired Africa’s potential to develop economically and maintain its social and political stability.

The Transatlantic slave trade radically impaired Africa's potential to develop economically and maintain its social and political stability. The arrival of Europeans on the West African Coast and their establishment of slave ports in various parts of the continent triggered a continuous process of.

The slave trade and its economic and social influence on the african continent

Nowhere is this more true than on the African continent, where developing nation-states were adversely impacted by the practice in every level of society.

The slave trade's negative cultural impact on families, larger social groups and established nation-states fundamentally changed the dynamics of the African continent's population.

What effects did the slave trade have on Africa? | eNotes